Author Archives: Tessa Arlen

An Edwardian Christmas at Iyntwood

In 1901 when Clementine, Lady Montfort was a young mother with three young children in the nursery it snowed that Christmas Eve as the Talbot family and their servants walked down St. Bartholomew’s church in the village for the evening … Continue reading

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British Tea and the Proper Wielding of Teapots.

I want to try to clarify some of the rules bout the ritual of tea time as it is probably one of the most misrepresented of British traditions.  

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Winston Churchill in Death Sits Down to Dinner

“Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.” ~ Winston S. Churchill Winston Spencer Churchill was the son of Lord Randolph Churchill, the third son of John Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough and Lady Randolph Churchill  (née … Continue reading

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Lady Montfort, Mrs. Jackson and the Agatha nomination

We, that is Clementine, Jackson and I have been nominated for an Agatha award for Best First novel: DEATH OF A DISHONORABLE GENTLEMAN. Sometimes it takes a day or two for good news to sink in and then its like drinking … Continue reading

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Sir Thomas Beecham and the Importance of Starting, and Finishing, Together

  April 29, 1879 – March 8, 1961 There are two golden rules for an orchestra: start together and finish together. The public doesn’t give a damn what goes on in between. —Sir Thomas Beecham Beecham’s grandfather, also Thomas Beecham, … Continue reading

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Mrs. Jackson and the Lancashire Witches

On All Hallows’ Eve downstairs in the servants’ hall at Iyntwood the maids light their turnip jack o’ lanterns and settle down with their cider and toasted nuts casting hopeful looks at the housekeeper to see if she is in the … Continue reading

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Maud, Lady Cunard and the Wounding Repartee

  ‘Let me introduce you to the man who killed Rasputin,’ Maud Cunard said to guests attending her large dinner party for the Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich. Pavlovich and his friend Prince Felix Yasupov were indeed the men who had … Continue reading

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Mrs. Jackson and the Golden Rules

It was between the wars that the whodunit murder mystery reached its greatest popularity. We call them cozies today, because they contain a minimum of violence –although the murder can be gruesome –and there is no sex whatsoever; even romance … Continue reading

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Why does the Britain of the early 1900s intrigue and delight so many of us?

Today the great houses of Britain’s landed aristocracy with their vast, exquisite interiors and views of sweeping parkland attest to the power of rank and wealth of a bygone age. They also provide a stunning backdrop for elegantly clothed men … Continue reading

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Daisy Brook and the Imprudent Letter

  Daisy Brook, who later became Daisy Greville, the Countess of Warwick, was one of the early Edwardian era’s great beauties and the center of it’s many scandals. She featured in DEATH OF A DISHONORABLE GENTLEMAN as an example of imprudence … Continue reading

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